Splitting stand caution...

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JustJim
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2021 9:12 am
Zip Code: 30540

Splitting stand caution...

Postby JustJim » Tue Jun 22, 2021 7:06 am

I read Barnyard's post today regards a splitting stand incident (spooky stuff!), and thought that perhaps I should share my recent near miss.

Now I'm new here, and realize I know very little. I'm writing this not for you old hands, but for others who may catch the Cub Bug in the future. I'm working on a '49 FCub, and stripping it way down to repair and restore. From reading here, I knew I needed a splitting stand, and I knocked out a pair of supports from some bed railing I had laying around. It's good tough steel (as I learned when sawing it), and as it's angle iron I felt the thin 1/8" stock would be sufficient in strength to support the Cub sans engine.

My problem came in part due to my unwise decision to mount them to the REAR implement flats. I failed to realize at the time that this narrow footprint would not be as sturdy as it could have been had I mounted them in the forward position.

With the rear end blocked up solidly under the differential, and a second set of blocks topped by a bottle jack just inside the R/H final drive, I thought I was ready to pull off the R/H wheel. The L/H wheel was previously removed, as well as the engine, bolster, front wheels etc. As I wrestled the remaining wheel off, I must have rocked the frame a bit, and the bottle jack slipped from its position. Luckily, it was trapped precariously against the final drive, hanging there at an angle of perhaps 25 degrees. Yikes!

I ran to my engine hoist, and staying as clear as I could, managed to get a sling around the R/H axle tube and get the tractor stable again. Thank goodness God looks after the foolish!

That off center design of the Cub needs to be carefully kept in mind, even when the engine, bolster, etc. has been removed. My stands withstood the test just fine, but as I evaluated my numerous foolish mistakes, I moved them to the forward mounting location, and found the stability to be GREATLY improved.

I hope this may help someone to be wiser and safer than I was! :oops:

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Peter Person
Cub Pro
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Re: Splitting stand caution...

Postby Peter Person » Tue Jun 22, 2021 10:08 am

Under the Rural and City Life section of the forum there is the How to Forum that has a subsection Specialty Tools.
Specialty Tools

Multiple versions of Splitting Stands can be found there.

Be safe!
1957 Farmall Cub "Emory", Fast-Hitch, L-F194 Plow & Colter, L-38 Disc Harrow, Cub-54A Blade, Cub-22 Sickle Bar Mower, IH 100 Blade

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Stoffregen Motorsports
Posts: 35
Joined: Sun May 30, 2021 10:27 am
Zip Code: 95614

Re: Splitting stand caution...

Postby Stoffregen Motorsports » Tue Jun 22, 2021 10:55 am

Bonehead mistakes happen. I'm a professional and have been building vehicles for many years, but just last year, I made a similar mistake. With the front of a newly built custom truck suspended by jack stands, I mistakenly put the truck in gear (while running) to test something. I forgot the front wheels were off the truck and as soon as the truck started moving a horrible vision materialized in my brain of the front wheels off the truck. It did tip the stands, but luckily not enough to drop onto the ground. Whew...

A few years ago I wondered how common it was for vehicles to fall off of two post lifts, so I googled it. There are videos on Youtube. Scary stuff...

Be careful guys! Spatial awareness is important while working on heavy things.

Clemsonfor
501 Club
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Tractors Owned: Yanmar YM2000
Yanmar YM186 (non running)
1952 Farmall Cub
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Location: Greenwood County SC

Re: Splitting stand caution...

Postby Clemsonfor » Tue Jun 22, 2021 9:33 pm

Stoffregen Motorsports wrote:Bonehead mistakes happen. I'm a professional and have been building vehicles for many years, but just last year, I made a similar mistake. With the front of a newly built custom truck suspended by jack stands, I mistakenly put the truck in gear (while running) to test something. I forgot the front wheels were off the truck and as soon as the truck started moving a horrible vision materialized in my brain of the front wheels off the truck. It did tip the stands, but luckily not enough to drop onto the ground. Whew...

A few years ago I wondered how common it was for vehicles to fall off of two post lifts, so I googled it. There are videos on Youtube. Scary stuff...

Be careful guys! Spatial awareness is important while working on heavy things.

Guy one a squarebody forum im on had his squarebody Suburban fall off a two post lift. It ended up messing up his pinion bearing of something and it took him a while to figure it out, swapped bearings in it twice. I can't even remember really what it was but it had something to do with the truck hitting the ground after falling off the lift.

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Glen
5+ Years
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Tractors Owned: 1956 Farmall Cub with Fast Hitch, F-11 plow, Disc, Cultivator, Cub-22 mower
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Location: Wa.

Re: Splitting stand caution...

Postby Glen » Tue Jun 22, 2021 9:50 pm

Hi,
If you are removing parts of the tractor from the rear area of a Cub, remember to put wooden wedges at the front axle pivot before beginning the work.
A Cub is heavier on the left side, and can tip over when removing heavy parts from the rear.
Below is a pic of the wedges, you will need to make them.
Hammer them tight into the pivot area, they should be tight on the top and bottom sides.
Be sure they don't hit at the small end, cut the small end some if they hit and don't tighten in place.
Check them some during the work to be sure that don't come loose. :)
Attachments
Cub wedges 2.jpg


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