Welding Fumes

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Welding Fumes

Postby Jeff Silvey » Sun Jan 29, 2012 8:53 pm

I found this on smokstaker.com. I thought I would share.
Be SAFE
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Anyone who welds - pro or hobby - this is a MUST read (SAFETY)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.brewracingframes.com/id75.htm

The guy used brake cleaner to clean a part before he welded it. He got a tiny puff of smoke and it literally almost killed him. The cleaner turned into Phosgene gas which is deadly.

Please pass this on to anyone who welds.

Jeff
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Re: Welding Fumes

Postby Bob Perry » Sun Jan 29, 2012 9:01 pm

Great advise, Jeff. Whenever possible, material needs to be as clean as possible, no chemicals, paint, etc. because when heated they can become deadly. Whenever possible, get outside, and hopefully there's air movement. Welding can be a rewarding skill, but unfortunately if we are careless, can be harmful or lethal. I think it's easy to become so focused on what we are trying to make or fix that we might not be as careful as we should.
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Re: Welding Fumes

Postby Bob Perry » Sun Jan 29, 2012 9:03 pm

Plus, pant legs always outside of shoes. If you ever had hot molten steel in your shoe you probably won't forget it !

Also those butane cigarette lighters in your pocket... have caused some guys some nasty burns.
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Re: Welding Fumes

Postby Bill Hudson » Sun Jan 29, 2012 9:28 pm

Yes, Jeff, phosgene is nasty stuff. It is made with carbon monoxide (CO) and chlorine (Cl2). I worked in a chemical plant that made COCl2 and we carried a gas mask at all times. On one hip was a canister (for low concentrations) and on the other hip was a connection for a fresh air supply that was piped throughout the plant. Not at all uncommon to spend several hours tethered to the fresh air supply. DO NOT TAKE PHOSGENE LIGHTLY!!

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Re: Welding Fumes

Postby John *.?-!.* cub owner » Sun Jan 29, 2012 11:07 pm

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Re: Welding Fumes

Postby Yogie » Thu Feb 02, 2012 10:29 pm

John *.?-!.* cub owner wrote:This has been discussed before
viewtopic.php?f=33&t=44092&p=364766&hilit=phosgene#p364766

Thanks Jeff,
I remembered this myself John and I've shared it with all the boys at work.
Before reading this I'd welded metal at work many, many times after cleaning it with Brakekleen. I've been lucky since I get really close while welding, it won't happen anymore. :wink:
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Re: Welding Fumes

Postby lazyuniondriver » Sun Nov 04, 2012 5:45 pm

Back in the 80's I recall reading an article in Firehouse Magazine about a tragic death from chemical poisoning of a little girl. To the best of my recollection, it went something like this:

The girls dad, a volunteer or paid part time firefighter responded to a call at a feed mill or some sort of fertilizer joint in the wee hours of the morning. It was either a squad call or a fire run in which no turn out gear was worn or, his gear was worn but got contaminated on the inside.

Arriving back home shortly before having to get up for work in the morning, he hit the couch instead of waking up his wife again. His young daughter heard him come in, got up and joined her Daddy on the couch.

The following day, his daughter presented lethargic like symptoms and was eventually hospitalized. A short period of time later, she was dead. 4 years old sticks in my mind.

It was later determined she had been poisoned by contact with a deadly chemical that was brought home on dads clothes. The concentration was harmless to adults but deadly to children. What a tragedy.

After reading that story, I became much more diligent about not wearing dirty work clothes around the house after coming in contact with chemicals at work or on the farm.
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Re: Welding Fumes

Postby beaconlight » Sun Nov 04, 2012 7:16 pm

It was one of the WWI poison gases. Another danger is welding galvanized. The zink can be nasty.
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