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Got a project that you are working on that is not a tractor? Maybe a barn to hold your tractors or just fun stuff like woodworking, glass, tools, sheds, gardens, custom implements, etc., this is the place to talk about it.
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Barnyard Annex - Part II

Tue Aug 28, 2012 7:56 pm

Well, we now have ownership of the old house across the road. We took a real good look behind the walls and under the floors today. We found full 2"x4" studs and some nice 12" floor joists (just what BOB needs). All of it appears to be red oak. None of that sissy 1 1/2" pine stuff here. We had already decided that most of the doors, the really neat fireplace and the old kitchen hand pump was going to be saved. After a good view of the structure (I couldn't look behind walls until it was ours) I believe we have a lot of salvageable material. It looks like my winter project will be dismantling this monster by hand.

Thanks to all the earlier comments from you all saying to look at it better.

Re: Barnyard Annex - Part II

Tue Aug 28, 2012 8:01 pm

Cool, Bill.

Why were you not able to look behind the walls until you bought it? Safety concerns?

Re: Barnyard Annex - Part II

Tue Aug 28, 2012 8:03 pm

Mr E wrote:Cool, Bill.

Why were you not able to look behind the walls until you bought it? Safety concerns?

The seller didn't want me tearing holes in his walls and then not buy the place. :lol: Some of the studs were visible from the outside but they were on the second floor and hard to tell from the ground. Since I was buying it just for the property I never gave the board condition any thought nor did I care at the time. I think I have a bit of a project on my hands this winter.

Re: Barnyard Annex - Part II

Wed Aug 29, 2012 6:38 am

It is amazing how much good usable material can come out of an old structure. I tear down old barns and clean up the old wood and make furniture or shop cabinets out of it. I sand it down to get the good look, planning is most likely to hit a nail.

Red oak? That would be one stout house. I got into a barn a few years back that had a lot of White Oak. Really pretty stuff, just so hard it was hard on my planner. Made a lot of furniture out of it. I have found a lot of good Yellow Pine in my last one, 2x4's up to 2x12'. Very heavy stuff.

Good luck, I would help if I could, just for the hunt of a treasure?

Re: Barnyard Annex - Part II

Wed Aug 29, 2012 7:21 am

Jason (IL) wrote:..................................................... I sand it down to get the good look, planning is most likely to hit a nail...................................?

That's why I use cheap aftermarket blades. Delta blades $64, Delta from Amazon at last check $49, aftermarket from Amazon $29. Seem as good as Delta. Neither one likes nails. With the cost of sanding belts it probably doesn't cost much if any more to risk hitting an unseen nail. And it sure is easier.

Bill, Glad to see you are looking at salvaging some of the lumber. It generally does finish up into beautiful wood. I often leave the nail holes and call them character marks. I have made wastebaskets from oak studs when my sister-in-law remodeled, a cherry ceiling joist from my nephews old playhouse that was torn down, and from an oak beam for a niece from grandpa's barn when it was torn down. You can't save every board foot or you never will get it torn down but I have used stuff I had to rip because one side was rotted. If you know a hobbiest woodworker enlist his help. You won't have as much to dispose of. Vern :)

Re: Barnyard Annex - Part II

Wed Aug 29, 2012 8:01 am

Bill,

Glad to hear that some of the materials will likely get re-purposed. :D

I have seen many instances around here, where old structures are just knocked down with a large excavator, loaded into dump trucks and hauled to the landfill. A real waste on both accounts.

Re: Barnyard Annex - Part II

Wed Aug 29, 2012 8:03 am

v w wrote:If you know a hobbiest woodworker enlist his help. You won't have as much to dispose of. Vern

Before we moved to the barnyard I had a lot of freetime. Small wood projects helped kill some of that time. I made this table for my daughter when she was five years old (she is now 27) She used it to do homwork, eat meals and play with her dolls. She will take it with her after she moves. I'd say it will continue in use for many years to come.

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It started life as an acorn, then a tree, then it was a shipping crate that was headed for the dumpster at work. My truck got between that crate and the dumpster.

Don McCombs wrote:I have seen many instances around here, where old structures are just knocked down with a large excavator, loaded into dump trucks and hauled to the landfill. A real waste on both accounts.

That was the original idea, but now that I have gotten a better look at what's there I have decided to take some time from my busy retirement schedule and pull some nails. :D Maybe I will play around with a few more wood projects.

Re: Barnyard Annex - Part II

Thu Aug 30, 2012 7:04 am

v w wrote:
Jason (IL) wrote:..................................................... I sand it down to get the good look, planning is most likely to hit a nail...................................?

That's why I use cheap aftermarket blades. Delta blades $64, Delta from Amazon at last check $49, aftermarket from Amazon $29. ..............
Do an internet search on "hand held metal detectors" found them from $20 up, most start about $150 though. Even at that saving a few planer blades from early retirement might be worth it.
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