Electric baseboard heat

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Jackman
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Electric baseboard heat

Postby Jackman » Sun Aug 07, 2016 5:50 am

I have a newish Weil McClain oil fired boiler its a good unit heats my down stairs and hot water very well, but the lay out of my house makes the second floor hard to heat I get a hot side and a cool side very uncomfortable, its one zone and splitting the zone is not doable so I am thinking of three separate electric baseboard heaters and three thermostats in each room ,,,,,,,,,,,,,what do ya think, everyone I speak to says electric baseboard is really expensive ,

Electric baseboard seems like the answer to me and the type house I have..... opinions please........

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Re: Electric baseboard heat

Postby Mike H » Sun Aug 07, 2016 7:39 am

electric is very expensive to operate.

sounds like the upstairs zone is lacking on flow.

do you have zone valves or circulating pumps to run zones.

Mike

Eugene
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Re: Electric baseboard heat

Postby Eugene » Sun Aug 07, 2016 10:18 am

I'm using an infrared space heater in the office on the first floor, only floor in the house other than a full basement. Propane fired furnace. Because of the duct system the bedrooms are about 10 to 15 degrees cooler than the living room.

Next item. I'm using in cold weather is a box fan to move warmed air from the original stone basement to below the floor of later date additions. And ceiling fans to transfer heat from the 10 foot tall ceilings on the first floor.

Floor register. Back in the old days the first floor was "heated". An opening in the ceiling and on the 2nd floor provided some warm air in winter.

Thinking I would investigate some method of moving hot air from one room to another in the upstairs rooms. Might only take two openings in the wall between the two rooms, one opening at floor level and an other opening at ceiling level. Perhaps a small fan in one opening.

Old house with very cold bathroom sandwiched between to adjacent rooms. Cut an opening near the ceiling. As soon as the opening was cut through the wall you could feel the air/heat transfer. Opening made the bathroom comfortable.

Edit: I have an oil filled radiator that is used in the basement bathroom during extremely cold weather. Basically the radiator is set on low, just enough to keep the plumbing next to the exterior wall from freezing.
I have an excuse. CRS.

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Re: Electric baseboard heat

Postby Bob McCarty » Sun Aug 07, 2016 10:24 am

There was a "This Old House" episode where Richard added some thermostatic valving to both baseboard and steam registers to correct a problem similar to yours. Might be a way to get more hot water to the cold areas and less to the hot areas.

Bob
"We don't need to think more,
we need to think differently."
-Albert Einstein

Eugene
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Re: Electric baseboard heat

Postby Eugene » Sun Aug 07, 2016 4:46 pm

Thinking. Hire a heating/AC engineer, not a heating/a&c company, to survey your house's heating and A/C system and provide recommendations. Probably the least expensive in the long run.

Another factor is insulation in ceiling and side walls.
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Jackman
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Re: Electric baseboard heat

Postby Jackman » Mon Aug 08, 2016 5:44 am

Appreciate the thoughts thanks :!: ,


Problem with the oil baseboard is the loop is way too big and to add to the problem the house originally had no heat or electricity upstairs , the piping is just wrong and the layout of the house makes it hard to run the pipes in the proper manner, going electric baseboard would be a breeze to install just not so sure what my electric bill would look like...

Eugene
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Re: Electric baseboard heat

Postby Eugene » Mon Aug 08, 2016 8:07 am

The tribulations of old home ownership. My house was built in 1897. Foundation of the original house is 18" thick from local quarried limestone. The forced air duct off the main trunk to the bathroom has 5 each 90 degree elbows. The ducts to the kitchen has 3 each 90 degree elbows. Makes the bath and kitchen quite a bit cooler in winter than the rest of the house.

The floor joists of the bath and kitchen go in the wrong direction to correct the problem, even if I knocked out some of the foundation wall.
I have an excuse. CRS.

Jackman
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Re: Electric baseboard heat

Postby Jackman » Mon Aug 08, 2016 8:21 am

When I bought this 1927 built home I was convinced I was getting a better built home than today's builds , was I never more wrong , this house is standing but the new builds blows this place away , live and learned :wink:

Originally it was center fed gravity hot air coal fired heat , a big 3x3 great in first floor absolutely nothing on second floor, they must have been hard core or slept in their winter coats :lol:

Eugene
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Re: Electric baseboard heat

Postby Eugene » Mon Aug 08, 2016 10:30 am

Jackman wrote:When I bought this 1927 built home I was convinced I was getting a better built home than today's builds , was I never more wrong , this house is standing but the new builds blows this place away , live and learned.
Agree. Newly constructed homes are more energy efficient if constructed following to current codes and the builder doesn't take short cuts.
Originally it was center fed gravity hot air coal fired heat, a big 3x3 great in first floor.
Last winter's project was to repair the floor that originally had the grate for a coal or wood fired furnace. Very long story. It took me 3 or 4 weeks working part time to frame up the opening, level up the sub floor, then cover with engineered flooring planks/panels.

Perhaps we should start an old house column.
I have an excuse. CRS.

Jackman
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Re: Electric baseboard heat

Postby Jackman » Tue Aug 09, 2016 5:26 am

I'm at the point of no return ,,,,, totally gutted a bathroom yesterday and took out the baseboard in one bed room , going kick-space electric forced air with thermostat in bathroom and electric baseboard with own thermostat in the cold room, the other two rooms will stay oil fired baseboard if I can find a way to run a new return line, running a new return will be a challenge there is zero empty spaces for a new 3/4 line.

Yeah an This Old House column would probably fit right in with the Farmall Cub membership .


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