It has come to this

Fri Apr 16, 2010 6:50 pm

Today my good friend Steve called and said i needed to go to this site for the NOAA. https://www.countmyfish.noaa.gov/
So now we have to register to deep sea fish, i wouldn't have believed it but it's legit. Being it that i don't like to be unprepared in most situations i am now registered.........i guess they will be watching me now ooooooooooooo :roll:

Re: It has come to this

Sun Apr 18, 2010 12:49 pm

You have to be registered to deep sea fish???? Since when??? Is that in American waters??? Or outside the line???? Kevin :shock: :shock: :shock: MORE Goverment b/s if you ask me.I can see why but!!!!!

Re: It has come to this

Mon Apr 19, 2010 9:43 am

Sounds like someone thinks the occasional fisherman could be a threat to commercial fishermen?? I believe I'll have another glass of kool aid.

Re: It has come to this

Mon Apr 19, 2010 10:12 am

Back in the days when fish were still plentiful, not too many years ago, private fisherman used to come back to the dock with 100 bluefish. Once the photo op was over at the dock they became crab food. Meat fisherman in the worst possible connotation. Some, if they brought enough ice, would sell them and they would go to the fish market, probably Fulton in New York. There is no question that the stocks are collapsing. Just about everything around here but stripers are in decline. This may not be the right or only answer to the big picture but it is clear that doing nothing is not the answer either. It used to be illegal to feed your slaves and indentured servants salmon more than twice a week in Connecticut. Sad commentary on both the past and the present. Big money still trumps good management, as shown in Doha recently where the Giant Tuna was not declared endangered. The Japanese lobbied hard to block this and certainly bought votes from small nations with no skin in the game. Plus the Mediterranean fleets fought this hard and since the tuna schools migrate back and forth across the Atlantic, that impacts us directly. Since the population is in dramatic decline this most recent squandered chance to give tuna CITES protection many scientists think the Giant Tuna is doomed. All so money can be made supplying $175 per pound sashimi in Tokyo. Nobody likes to lose what they had but some losses are more permanent than others.

Re: It has come to this

Mon Apr 19, 2010 11:43 am

Bob,
Thanks for shedding some light on WHY it has come to this.

Re: It has come to this

Mon Apr 19, 2010 12:07 pm

It is scary around here. 10 years ago you could walk across the back of alewives and blueback herring when they were running. The Holyoke Dame recorded 630,000 herring in 1985. In 2006 they recorded 21 fish. Even though nobody knows why, I think that indicates that it may be time to pull out all the stops.

Re: It has come to this

Mon Apr 19, 2010 5:44 pm

A lot of people would like to lay this problem at the feet of the recreational fisherman. In reality, the recreational catch is miniscule compared to the commercial catch. Sure, there have been abuses like Bob mentioned. But, they are the exception rather than the rule. The fish don't know where the US territorial waters end, but the foreign fishing fleets certainly do. It's going to take a lot more than restricting US recreational fisherman to solve this very real problem. We spend millions on programs like Cash for Clunkers, while cutting the US Coast Guard's budget.

Re: It has come to this

Mon Apr 19, 2010 6:14 pm

I agree. Licensing fees only contribute to the cost of management. Going to a fishing town and announcing catch limits is about as popular as suggesting handguns be banned at a NRA convention. Meanwhile big factory ships are harvesting everything they can suck in and produce fish meal with the trash fish and they leave nothing behind. They don't even know where to begin to restore the herring runs. They have no idea what caused the collapse and where to even look.

I by no means suggest recreational fisherman are the problem. But it is so bad now I have no problem participating in the shared pain. In fact we release almost everything we catch now except the occasional fluke or blackfish.

Re: It has come to this

Tue Apr 20, 2010 9:57 am

I got my FREE permit a month back. That only gets me thru this year. Starting next year in Massachusetts there will be a State License required to fish in State water ( I think its 3 miles out) and this one will not be free. Many of the New England States are doing the same thing. I know its not my fishing skills that are depleting the stock. I don’t mind the License because I fish regularly but anyone that I bring along on the boat will also need to get one. That is troublesome and eliminates any last minuet plans to fish for some. I am hoping to use my Federal License this week to Cod and Haddock fish at Stellwagon Bank. My hope is to deplete the stock and fill my freezer.
Wally

*****Update- Game-On we are heading out at 6am. I will post a few pictures. One great thing about fishing off Cape Cod is we see whales all day long and lots of other cool sea life. Almost makes it worth the trip but a few fish help also.

Re: It has come to this

Fri Apr 23, 2010 9:47 pm

Bob in CT wrote:Back in the days when fish were still plentiful, not too many years ago, private fisherman used to come back to the dock with 100 bluefish. Once the photo op was over at the dock they became crab food. Meat fisherman in the worst possible connotation. Some, if they brought enough ice, would sell them and they would go to the fish market, probably Fulton in New York. There is no question that the stocks are collapsing. Just about everything around here but stripers are in decline. This may not be the right or only answer to the big picture but it is clear that doing nothing is not the answer either. It used to be illegal to feed your slaves and indentured servants salmon more than twice a week in Connecticut. Sad commentary on both the past and the present. Big money still trumps good management, as shown in Doha recently where the Giant Tuna was not declared endangered. The Japanese lobbied hard to block this and certainly bought votes from small nations with no skin in the game. Plus the Mediterranean fleets fought this hard and since the tuna schools migrate back and forth across the Atlantic, that impacts us directly. Since the population is in dramatic decline this most recent squandered chance to give tuna CITES protection many scientists think the Giant Tuna is doomed. All so money can be made supplying $175 per pound sashimi in Tokyo. Nobody likes to lose what they had but some losses are more permanent than others.


IMO, the two main causes for the decline in the health of our oceans and fisheries are pollution and industrialized fishing.... the oceans, no matter how big they may seem can not sustain either. The pollution problem is everyone's fault... industrialized fishing is the result of the great mismanagement of our fisheries by NOAA's use of bad/incomplete and often politically motivated science.

as for a cites listing.... it would have done absolutely no good. All it would have accomplished is further punished The US and Canadian fisherman who have followed the strictest and tightest regulations when it comes to bluefin tuna and get sold down the river by NOAA and the Government every time we turn around. If cites would have passed, Japan and several of the EU countries stated they would take a reservation from the treaty. Those other med countrie's, who did not take a reservation, fishing fleets would just re-flag under the African countries on the southern med as they have done before just over quotas and the raping of the med would continue without even the little oversight Iccat has now. Business as usual for the big industrialized fishing machine while the US and Canadain hook and line fisherman are put out of business. :evil:

Re: It has come to this

Sun May 02, 2010 11:52 am

I just got my freshwater and saltwater license at $60. I don't saltwater fish that much but for $60 i will fish more for stripers/blues/blackfish now. Plus its time to teach the kids about saltwater fishing too. BB

I'm all for limits on catches and the size of both saltwater and freshwater fish. In bad times i have seen 2" sunfish being taken to eat. All i can say is they can get food stamps right?

I catch and release but i do take the smaller bass(just two or three) to feed my abandon kittens that i rescue.

Re: It has come to this

Wed May 26, 2010 1:13 pm

Don McCombs wrote:A lot of people would like to lay this problem at the feet of the recreational fisherman. In reality, the recreational catch is miniscule compared to the commercial catch.


commercial
grumpy wrote:Sounds like someone thinks the occasional fisherman could be a threat to commercial fishermen?? I believe I'll have another glass of kool aid.


the ol commercial fisherman vs. recreational fisherman debate..... the environmental groups & NOAA have made this there attacking point from which untold mis-managements of our fisheries have occurred.... the ol divide and conquer routine. The truth of the matter is neither group, if they had their way would allow anyone to fish. here's a good example of how NMFS/NOAA has set the bluefin tuna fishery up for great user conflicts & management failure.......

http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/sfa/hms/Adviso ... y_2010.pdf

Current operational system adequate to manage commercial landings fishery in real time
Current system not designed to monitor recreational landings in real time for in-season management

2009 Blue fin tuna landings and quotas-

*commercial fisherman filled just over 50% of there allotted quota for 2009 & thats including the industrialized fishing of purse seiners and long liners

*recreational fisherman caught 300% OVER their quota in the same time period....

Who is really playing by the rules?
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Re: It has come to this

Wed May 26, 2010 4:07 pm

Since the recreational fishery is not monitored in real time, how would the recreational angler know what the quotas are and if they have been met, before deciding to boat or release?

Re: It has come to this

Wed May 26, 2010 4:27 pm

Don McCombs wrote:Since the recreational fishery is not monitored in real time, how would the recreational angler know what the quotas are and if they have been met, before deciding to boat or release?


nmfs/noaa are responsible for closing a fishery when a quota has been reached..... it's obvious with the current system they don't know. Some our government's fishery management at its finest....

Re: It has come to this

Wed May 26, 2010 4:31 pm

Agreed.