Possible Alternative Pump for the BackYard Parts Cleaner Pro

Easy ways to clean parts, remove broken bolts, etc.

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Postby Eugene » Sun Dec 02, 2007 6:43 pm

Finally found an inexpensive pump for the home built parts washer. It's a Jabsco pump, Series 17250, 0-3.5 GPM at 2 PSI. Powered by an electric drill. Retail price $27.07. http://www.pumpagents.com/JabscoPumps/172150000.html

I have used this pump with an 18V DC powered electric drill. Works well. The fluid flow rate can be controled by speeding up or slowing down the drill.

Currently looking for a small variable speed DC motor to power the pump. I have an old trolling motor that may work or as another thought, a windshield wiper motor
I have an excuse. CRS.
Eugene
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Postby BigBill » Tue Dec 18, 2007 8:31 am

I been pondering building one instead of buying one too. For many years its been the large blue tub from walmart with no pump just a brush.

I been thinking of a barrel parts washer. A barrel with the pump at the bottom or slightly above the bottom so it can't pickup dirt/grime. Then a box on top for washing parts. I think the plastic tub inside a steel housing would work out well. I have a little brass coolant/oil transfer pump with a cogg belt drive setup. If I can save $100 or more building it then its a go..
I'm technically misunderstood at times i guess its been this way my whole life so why should it change now.
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Postby Bill Hudson » Tue Dec 18, 2007 9:50 am

Somewhere, I believe in one of my farm mags, I saw a parts cleaner made from a LARGE oil pan from a large diesel engine. Might be something to consider.

Bill
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Postby Eugene » Tue Dec 18, 2007 9:55 am

http://www.farmallcub.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=18712

This parts washer was built from junk on hand. During conversations with Rudi - he was thinking about using lumber for the frame. The major plus is that you can put very large parts in it, including an engine block.

My largest expense was and still is the kerosene utilized as the solvent. Most of the original kerosene is still in the parts washer - around 4 or 5 years. About once a year I just clean out the settlings and top off with a gallon or two of kerosene.

My first couple of attempts on this parts washer - I used automotive oil filters to filter the fluid. I found that the oil filters plug up in very short order.
I have an excuse. CRS.
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