New rear rims...

Tue Sep 21, 2004 7:53 pm

Figurin' I don't have time to do it all, I got a quote today for taking the AGs off and putting the Turfs on the rear rims.

Basically $65 each, plus $25 each if they're "wet", which I think they probably are, even if only partially.

So I'm thinking instead that I'll buy two new rims and have the turfs mounted on *them*, that way I can switch them out if I ever wanted to, or just sell the AGs on the original rims...

Any thoughts about that? I see MillerTire.com has the rims for $80 each. Maybe if I can mount the new ones myself, I can do it for basically the same cost as getting the job done for me... Not sure I can stretch a big tire like that onto a rim tho'! :shock:

Tue Sep 21, 2004 7:56 pm

That's the way I would go. Those tires are not that hard to mount.

Easier?

Tue Sep 21, 2004 7:58 pm

Actually, would it be easier with the big tires as opposed to the little ones on the front?

I gave up after a while with the fronts and had them done at the local garage, as much to save the tubes from my jerry-rigged and sharp-pointed tools as to save myself the effort. :)

There's more span to work with on the rears, but the rubber and the steel bead are probably heavier.

Well, time will tell - I'll order up the new rims and let you know!

Tue Sep 21, 2004 8:00 pm

I would much rather change one of those than the fronts.

Tue Sep 21, 2004 8:15 pm

BigDog's right, those big rear tires are a piece of cake. You'll have less problems with the front tires if you use a set of tire spoons, but I haven't seen a set in many years. Also, practice makes it easier - fix some wheel barrow tires before fooling with the Cub and you'll appreciate the difference!

Tue Sep 21, 2004 8:27 pm

Hey Carl! When are you heading west?

Tue Sep 21, 2004 9:03 pm

BD,

I've got a lil bundle of joy for ya, from way up north, all tucked away safe and sound for the long trip over the mountains and across the river. I'm leaving tomorrow morning after I get my hair cut. I'm afraid it could get all tangled up out there in the windy mid-west. I should be lurking around Fredericktown by late Thursday afternoon.

Cathy's flying in Friday night, using up some of those free miles she's been accumulating. The breathtaking Madison Inn, shiny red and yellow Cubs and Cadets all lined up in neat rows, all those nifty attachments carefully restored by their owners, tractor parts galore. She shook all over and bawled like a baby when I told her the reservations and everything was all lined up for us to attend. Now, that's excitement!

Carl

Tue Sep 21, 2004 9:22 pm

Cool! See ya Thursday!

Wed Sep 22, 2004 12:23 am

Allen,

When I had my new tires mounted, 2 new ones on the front and 1 new on the rear. They didn't charge me for the front mounting since I bought all the tires and tubes from them. They did charge me a flat 25 bucks for the rear for mounting, which I thought was real reasonable.

None of my tires were "wet" nor did I want them filled, more than likely that would have been more money. My rims didn't appear to ever have any calcium chloride in them. (I thinking that's what is used in them) All I know for sure, that's the first thngs that goes, before anything does. I know if may be beneficial for some people, but NOT for my needs.

I totally agree with you and I think I have have already talked about this while back in getting another extra set of rear rims to mount turf tires on. I think it would be money saved and not to mention time, in the long haul by doing this. Only takes a few minutes jacking up the tractor and switching them over. I plan on doing this over the winter months and have them all ready for Spring next year.

If you like me, (not changing tires everyday) your bound to pinch a tube, then if they are filled........WELL, we all know what that corrosive stuff is like, especially on a open cut. Dang that sure does burn.,

Which reminds me of another story when I was a kid. Growing up we didn't farm, we had a old salvage yard. LOTS OF OLD TRACTORS, anyhow Dad had this REAL piece of S*** narrow front end Massey Harris tractor to drag junk around and I was driving it and I hit something hidden in the weeds and sliced a tire. That stuff went everywhere and including my eyes, never had so much pain everywhere, beleive me being a kid and in a junk yard, I had cuts and scratches all over, so I had pain everywhere. THEN to top it off afterwards dad made me take the tire off the rim, WHAT PUNISHMENT! To this day, I still hate that Massey.

John Niekamp

new rear rims

Wed Sep 22, 2004 8:51 am

Cheap is my first, middle and last name. I would not pay someone $65.00 an hour to change rear tractor tires. It is not much of a job to change rear tractor tires even with fluid.

The biggest problem is breaking the bead. I use a couple of dulled flat pry bars, and drive them between the rim and tire.

Bead

Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:17 am

Thankfully I won't have to break the bead, as the rims will be new... I ordered the new rims this morning, they ended up being $105 each with shipping. More than I expected, but still easier and better than just tire swapping.

Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:37 am

Allen,

It should be an easy job since you don't have to break the beads... easier than hauling them to the tire shop.

Mount the rim on the tractor and lube the bead with your choice... even soapy water. Hang the tire from the rim with the bead in the well at top. It won't take much more than kicking the bead to get the bottom over the lip. The 38" tires on the H and M are even easier.

I'll turn 70 in a month and am disabled, but I swapped 6 rears yesterday.

Wed Sep 22, 2004 3:59 pm

You can get tire spoons at Tractor Supply. Definitely an invaluable tool if you plan on changing tires.

Another nice-to-have is a "bead breaker" hammer. The thing looks positively evil, but you can pop even the biggest beads loose with it.

When you go to install those rears, you'll find out how thin and pliable modern tractor tires are. Nothing like the ones from even 25 years ago. Did the rear on my Dad's M a couple years ago. Other than using that old POS laundry machine pump to move the fluid, it was a cakewalk.

What's hard is getting one of those tedder tires off the rim. It's a 6" rim, and flimsy.

Thu Sep 23, 2004 3:19 pm

Mr. GW wrote:
I'll turn 70 in a month and am disabled, but I swapped 6 rears yesterday.


Mr. GW,

Wish you could have been here earlier today. I put the original Firestone Champion Ground Grip tires back on the rims. Took about 1 1/2 hours for both tires. Those old tires have very stiff side walls :!:

Congatulations on being 70 and swapping 6 rears in one day. I hope I'm in that good of shape in 20 years. 8)

Thu Sep 23, 2004 3:29 pm

Donny M wrote:Mr. GW wrote:
I'll turn 70 in a month and am disabled, but I swapped 6 rears yesterday.


Mr. GW,

Wish you could have been here earlier today. I put the original Firestone Champion Ground Grip tires back on the rims. Took about 1 1/2 hours for both tires. Those old tires have very stiff side walls :!:

Congatulations on being 70 and swapping 6 rears in one day. I hope I'm in that good of shape in 20 years. 8)


Donny,

I'm not really in very good shape. I just started practicing early to make every move count. Here are some rules that may help:

1. Never stand up when you can sit down.

2. Never sit down when you can lay down.

3. Spinning the wheels rarely helps.

I hope this helps!