Water filled tires

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CaptPaulret
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Water filled tires

Postby CaptPaulret » Thu Apr 08, 2004 3:18 pm

Have any of you drained the water from the rear tires? I need to remove the water and calicum from the rear tires on my cub so I can mount the tires on the new rims I bought. Being a stubborn old fart I like to do all my own work, plus save some dollars so I can buy more attachments for my new 55 cub. I plan on using the new/old wheel weights and not filling the tires with water. All suggestions appreciated.
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Postby johnbron » Thu Apr 08, 2004 3:54 pm

I think the calcium might take a special procedure with some sort of retriever pump.
"BUT" if it is only water then you just remove the valve core and let it flow. Put the valve stem at the 6: O`clock on finish drain.
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Postby Bigdog » Thu Apr 08, 2004 4:47 pm

Calcium is nasty to handle and very detrimental to the environment. If you can, take the tires to an ag tire dealer and have him pump out the calcium. He can dispose of it properly. It won't cost too much. Then you can remove your tires and re-mount them on your new rims. Tight as I am, I'd spring for new tubes too. You'll never get all of the solution out of the old tubes.
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Postby WKPoor » Thu Apr 08, 2004 6:46 pm

Dittos for bigdoogy. I had a couple of sets pumped out myself. Found a local guy who does it as a side job. $30.00 a pair. Well worth it. I'd replace the tubes for sure also. Never know how old or long that calcium's been there. On the flip side though- loaded tires provide very efficient added traction and with clean rims and new tubes will last for many years. Must remember that a lot of tractors were probably loaded up 30-40 yrs ago. I'm seriously thinking or reloading mine after replacing the tubes. wk

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Postby Chess » Fri Apr 09, 2004 7:48 am

I uderstand about the water adding weight to the tractor, but I don't know about the calcium.
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Postby Ron L » Fri Apr 09, 2004 7:56 am

Chess wrote:I uderstand about the water adding weight to the tractor, but I don't know about the calcium.
Mike.

Mike. The calcium stops it from freezing in the very cold weather. Could you imagine having plain water in your tires in zero degree temps? (I guess you wouldn't understand that in Fla!!) :wink:

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Postby johnbron » Fri Apr 09, 2004 8:58 am

Plus the calcium is supposed to be a self-sealant for small puncture holes. :?:
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Postby Jim Becker » Fri Apr 09, 2004 9:00 am

johnbron wrote:Plus the calcium is supposed to be a self-sealant for small puncture holes. :?:


I don't know about that. It definitely adds more weight than plain water.

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Postby johnbron » Fri Apr 09, 2004 9:13 am

Jim Becker wrote:
johnbron wrote:Plus the calcium is supposed to be a self-sealant for small puncture holes. :?:


I don't know about that. It definitely adds more weight than plain water.

*******************

Jim we used to use it for weight in all of our tractors when I worked for a large landscape company and it also would stop small hole leaks but not a gash or large cut wound.

My boss was sold on the stuff but he made a big mistake when he put it in a skid-steer tires.

Ya`know I might be off base on this calcium subject cause what we used at the time was a special mud slurry and I dont know if it was calcium or what but I remember that it was not cheap and was transfered from tire to tire when changed or repaired.
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Postby Brent » Fri Apr 09, 2004 9:17 am

:shock: I bought a new tire and tube from my local Goodyear dealer. I told him the tires probably had calcium in them. He looked at me like I was nuts and drained it right in front of the shop. He'll listen the next time. What a mess! By the time I left the hatch cover for the waste oil tank, which is in the ground, was pitted and rusted and he had a nice white line from where he let the water out almost to the street. His remark was that they never used calcium in So. California. My Cub came from New Jersey. Is there anything that will neutralize that stuff?
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Postby John *.?-!.* cub owner » Fri Apr 09, 2004 9:33 am

johnbron wrote:Ya`know I might be off base on this calcium subject cause what we used at the time was a special mud slurry and I dont know if it was calcium or what but I remember that it was not cheap and was transfered from tire to tire when changed or repaired.

In my part of the country they used an item called iron balllast in industrial equipment, that was a powder made from tif (barite) and other additives. It was heavier than calcium cloride and wasn't corosive. They mad a slurry version of it, but I never knew of it being used around here. That is probably what your boss was using.
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Postby George Willer » Fri Apr 09, 2004 10:10 am

Calcium chloride that is used in tires is a salt, similar to common table salt. It is used for ice control on the roads here in Ohio. It works at lower temperatures than sodium chloride so it is sometimes mixed right in with the road salt. It also works well for dust control for the same reason it destroys rims... it draws water from the air, so it stays wet. The harm to the environment is mostly what it does to leather, and it can kill weeds. It will ruin a good pair of boots quickly. I have several more tractors that I will soon remove it from, and I'll do it in my driveway. This time I'll remember to not wear my good Wolverines.
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Postby Indiana Robinson » Sat Apr 10, 2004 7:56 am

As usual George is right on target... The effects of calcium chloride on the environment except on metals is grossly overblown. They apply thousands of tons of it to our northern roads every winter. Sodium Chloride (applied as rock salt) loses most of its effectiveness below about 15 to 20 degrees F. From there on down they use mostly Calcium Chloride. It is also still used on many gravel roads in front of houses in the summer to control dust (it draws moisture).
Calcium chloride will not stop leaks.
To remove it from tires you can jack up the tractor and turn the stem to the top and remove the core or the whole stem insert on two piece stems. Slip a tube over the valve stem and stick the other end in a container like a plastic barrel (a steel barrel will work short term). Or like George drain it out in a driveway away from plants or metal stuff. Don't drain it above a buried iron water pipe. Turn the wheel to place the stem to the bottom and lower the tractor so that the weight will push most of the solution out. To get out what is left I often use my 10 gallon shop vac that has a stainless steel tank and just hold the hose tightly over the stem and suck it out. You can also use a plastic tank shop vac. Be sure to rinse the vac out well with clear water. Flush down the tractor and wheel well also.
Another option is what I often have used on full sized tractor rears. You can buy a stem adapter from most farm stores which can be used for both filling and emptying tires. I pump the fluid out and back in using an old field sprayer pump. The fittings are the same as garden hose threads and I just use a good garden hose. Rinse everything well when done and put oil in the pump. Note: When you use the pump sometimes you get lucky and as it pumps out it will pull the tire away from the bead as it collapses the tire. I always clean and paint the rims when I change a rear tire.
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