Crankshaft Pulley

Sun Dec 21, 2003 9:26 pm

I'm done with the rebuild on my '49 and now have come to the point of reinstalling the crank pulley. Has anyone had any experience with the reinstallaion? Any tips or tricks I should know? Any help would be appreciated.
-Thanks
Eric

Sun Dec 21, 2003 9:34 pm

If you wait until your wife isn't home you can heat it up in the oven before you pull it on.

Mon Dec 22, 2003 9:39 am

Eric,

Bigdog is right, the oven really helps. I took a piece of 3/8"x 2" flat stock long enough to cover the diameter of the pully, drilled a 1/2" hole in the middle then used a series of 1/2" bolts. I think they were from 4 1/2" long to 3" long. Put the plate over the pully, screw the 4 1/2" bolt into the end of the crank and tighten all the way. Then use the 3" and keep doing that until the pully bottoms out. It should go on pretty easy. My old memory isn't remembering what size bolt fits the threded end of the crank so you might want to check for yourself.

Mon Dec 22, 2003 10:18 am

Brent Duxbury wrote:Eric,

Bigdog is right, the oven really helps. I took a piece of 3/8"x 2" flat stock long enough to cover the diameter of the pully, drilled a 1/2" hole in the middle then used a series of 1/2" bolts. I think they were from 4 1/2" long to 3" long. Put the plate over the pully, screw the 4 1/2" bolt into the end of the crank and tighten all the way. Then use the 3" and keep doing that until the pully bottoms out. It should go on pretty easy. My old memory isn't remembering what size bolt fits the threded end of the crank so you might want to check for yourself.


The thread is 1/2-13. The bolt idea works OK, but it's much better to use a piece of threaded rod screwed in all the way and a nut to push on the plate. It's easier, but more importantly... it eliminates the possibility of stripping the threads in the crankshaft by a bolt not seated deeply enough. It may take a hard pull. :cry:

Tue Dec 23, 2003 10:50 am

George, I never thought of the threaded rod. That sure eliminates the need for a covey of bolts. Guess that's what comes from restoring a bunch of Cubs rather than one. Some day I might catch up. Got my eye on a low serial # 47 right now and a Cletrac. Don't know which to latch onto first.

Tue Dec 23, 2003 11:33 am

Brent Duxbury wrote:Got my eye on a low serial # 47 right now and a Cletrac. Don't know which to latch onto first.


Brent,

Try to get them both! A '47 with an original grille would be a real prize. Be careful with the Cletrac though. Make sure you get a good engine. I understand parts for the little Hercules are made of either gold or unobtanium. :D

Tue Dec 23, 2003 4:35 pm

Hi All,

I hopefully will soon be doing this for the first time. I read in the manual
to put the pulley in boiling water for a period of time. Has anyone tried this
and does it work as well as in the oven? What about using a propane torch
or would this be too much concentrated heat?

Awaiting a reply. Thanks. :idea:

Tue Dec 23, 2003 7:28 pm

If I'm remembering my high-school physics right, water stays at boiling temp until turned to steam, so the oven would get the pulley hotter.

As for the torch question, hmmm, I would guess that it would do no damage considering the density of the pulley, but I'm not sure it would heat the pulley any quicker. If left in the oven at X deg until the oven is heated to that temp, the pulley should be the same temp all the way through, and (in theory) hold the temp longer.

My 2c

Wed Dec 24, 2003 10:36 am

I heated one using a Coleman stove, but remember that if you get it too hot you will damage the seal lip. then you get to do it over again. :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: